Home » Culture and food safety awareness by Agnes N. Ngale Lyonga
Culture and food safety awareness Agnes N. Ngale Lyonga

Culture and food safety awareness

Agnes N. Ngale Lyonga

Published
ISBN : 9781109315288
NOOKstudy eTextbook
257 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This study determined concerns and perceptions of food safety risks among international students by cultural regions and explored cultural influences on food safety behaviors. It examined the prevalence of self-reported foodborne illness includingMoreThis study determined concerns and perceptions of food safety risks among international students by cultural regions and explored cultural influences on food safety behaviors. It examined the prevalence of self-reported foodborne illness including factors associated with unsafe food handling practices and assessed preferred delivery methods and information sources for training.-Mixed methods was utilized, an electronic group discussion method with 58 international students at NDSU Group Decision Center and an online survey to eight land-grant institutions (n = 904). Respondents agreed that food safety is an important issue. Major food safety concerns were foodborne diseases, contaminated food, residues and toxins, additives and preservatives, high sugar and fat diets. Respondents were unlikely to perceive the occurrence of a food safety problem in their residence- whereas 24.9% do not believe that foodborne illness is common. A self-reported prevalence of 28.6% of study population had been sick of foodborne within the past year in the U.S., 10.1% have sought medical attention, and 3.2% have reported a foodborne illness. Factors influencing unsafe food handling behaviors were lack of hand washing, incorrect thawing, improper cooking, and holding leftovers for prolonged periods at room temperature. Respondents agreed that their food handling and preparation behaviors are influenced by their cultures.-Interest in multiple avenues for food safety training was indicated. Many preferred workshops and seminars (50%), brochures (48%), and campus orientation seminars (45%) as a delivery method. Others (42%) preferred learning in a social setting, 29% classroom setting and 20% preferred interactive online classes for short-time segments. Preferred information sources were food packages (56%), TV programs (52%), leaflets (40%), magazines (34%), campus emails (33%), blog postings (17%). Educators can target this audience using the preferred delivery methods.