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Juvenile Delinquents, Their Condition and Treatment Mary Carpenter

Juvenile Delinquents, Their Condition and Treatment

Mary Carpenter

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230315409
Paperback
114 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ... An experiencedMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ... An experienced visitor from a distance, who one day came to our school, remarked, you have done much good by showing what you cannot do. The remark encouraged me, for it proved that the speaker understood our difficulties, and saw the need of a more effective remedy than we could apply. Here are some of the cases which show what we have not been able to do, and what we cannot do by any exertion we can make. Of the very first scholars whom I remember in our school at its commencement six years ago, almost all have been since in prison, one has been transported- the instruction given them during a few hours in the day could not counteract the hourly influences to evil under which they had been brought up. They had all bad mothers, and I have never known children grow up in virtuous habits when the mother was bad. Our efforts with six of these boys particularly have been unceasing, but we have found it impossible ever to induce them to attend school regularly, nor could we produce any sensible effect on one of them, until they were removed from their parents. We have not been able to arrest the progress of crime in the family of the C--s- the father kept a little shop near the school, and boasted of his connections and of the good society in which be was received- the children had had a tolerable education, and should have been above the Ragged School, but their deportment and moral tone were below even that of our children- the fathers dissolute habits prepared the children for vice- the second son gloried in being spoken of in the newspapers as the head of the gang of juvenile thieves in the neighbourhood- his younger brother followed his example, and the school, which could produce no restraining effect upon them, was greatly...